The Judgement of Jeremy

2 09 2015
Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn

“Jawad’s case is, I believe, a miscarriage of justice”

A miscarriage of justice; that’s how Jeremy Corbyn described the conviction of Jawad Botmeh, sentenced to 20 years in prison for terrorist offences, in a letter to Botmeh’s employer.

There is a chasm of difference between ‘miscarriage of justice’ and failing to get off on a technicality. That difference seems lost on Corbyn.

Botmeh’s conviction is discussed in a lot more detail in an earlier post – click here – but here are a few salient details: Read the rest of this entry »

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Jeremy Corbyn – The Bombers’ friend

31 08 2015
Jeremy Corbyn

Jeremy Corbyn

Samar Alami

Samar Alami

Jawad Botmeh

Jawad Botmeh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Much has been made of Jeremy Corbyn’s associates in recent weeks but no attention has been given so far to his  dedicated support and campaigning inside and outside parliament for, two terrorists convicted in relation to bombings which maimed 20 people in the UK. Read the rest of this entry »





Suzanne and Society

14 08 2011

Category; Criminal Law, Politics

© Getty

Someone I’ll call Suzanne was on my mind recently, while society watched, horrified, as the certainty of order disappeared.

Throughout Britain, smiling as they smashed in shops to take what they felt like or simply burn the place down, I saw lots of Suzannes.

I first met Suzanne because she’d been charged with theft. The childrens’ home she lived in, or rather was based in, had called the police after she had demanded a pound for an ice-cream and, when they had refused because of some rule infraction, she had gone and taken the pound anyway. They called the police because she took a pound. And the police came. And they arrested her. And the CPS charged her. And she was sent to court. Because she stole a pound for an ice-cream. Read the rest of this entry »





Flash Yob

13 08 2011

Category; Politics, Criminal Law

There’s an anguished debate in the UK, and much puzzled scrutiny from abroad, about the nature of the recent civil disturbances in the UK; it’s usually referred to as ‘rioting‘, but they weren’t really riots.

People can’t see past political motivation for such disorder; the Syrian Ambassador to the UN was even crowing that they mirrored what was happening in Syria – see here. Well, he would, woudn’t he…

It’s very simple. They were Flash Mobs with looting and/or destruction;  a Flash Yob.





Rowan Laxton Speaks…

12 12 2010

Category; Rowan Laxton, Criminal Law, Anti-Semitism, Middle East

© Daily Telegraph

Professor Geoffrey Pullum has been speaking up for Rowan Laxton on his blog. It’s interesting to read the views on the subject of a distinguished American academic living in the UK especially as he’s had the benefit of a phone conversation with Laxton himself… Read the rest of this entry »





Legislating without due care and attention

21 08 2010

Category: Law, Criminal Law, Politics

Solicitor Nick “Mr Loophole” Freeman is so proud of his reputation for securing acquittals for road traffic offences that he has a google ad that pops up if you type Mr Loophole. He has also trademarked the name – click here. Read the rest of this entry »





Clean up the mess

20 05 2010

Category: Politics, Law

The British Deputy Prime Minister has announced that some of the thousands of laws created by the last government will be scaled back.

Good thing too. There are plenty that can be got rid of, but in terms of criminal law it’s the absurd complexity that needs to be addressed head on.

I’ve devoted several posts on this blog to someone who was charged with the most minor criminal offence possible. That case was interesting for other reasons, but the procedures highlight what an unwieldy monster the criminal justice system has become.

I’ll try and break down the case so you can see what I mean… Read the rest of this entry »